Author Topic: Courses  (Read 362 times)

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p4portra

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Courses
« on: December 14, 2017, 11:10:49 AM »
Hi All,

I have spent the last few years switching between film and digital, but not have gone balls deep into film.

I am wondering if anyone can recommend a good course for learning how to develop and print film?

I have succesfully developed a few rolls of black and white film at home, but would like to learn more about the process/pushing film/pros and cons of different recipes/methods of printing/dodging and burning etc.

Thanks,

Thomas

Francois

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Re: Courses
« Reply #1 on: December 14, 2017, 03:29:49 PM »
Well, YouTube is probably the best class there is. The art of photography channel has some pretty good information.
You could also check out khan academy. I don't know if they have film related classes but they have so much stuff online it's insane.

Or you could just check here. Technically we probably have all the info you need.
If you want to get more than you want, there's always apug. I know they changed the name of the place but it's easy to find.

Now if you want a credited class... I really don't know where to look.... I know Rochester institute of technology used to have one of the best programs anywhere.
Francois

Film is the vinyl record of photography.

Bryan

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Re: Courses
« Reply #2 on: December 14, 2017, 03:52:13 PM »
It also depends on where you are, there may be local schools, darkrooms or other places that offer courses.  I know in Seattle the photography shop Glazers puts on workshops.  I think they have had classes on film, they do sell a lot of film, chemistry and darkroom equipment.  I

http://www.glazerscamera.com/workshops

Ilford has a list of public and private darkrooms.  If there is one in your area they may have classes.

http://www.localdarkroom.com/

MaxR88

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Re: Courses
« Reply #3 on: December 14, 2017, 05:07:19 PM »
AG Photographic in Birmingham run some courses, never done it but maybe worth a look?
« Last Edit: December 14, 2017, 05:08:57 PM by MaxR88 »

kentish cob

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Re: Courses
« Reply #4 on: December 14, 2017, 05:48:05 PM »
I notice you're in Kent, Thomas, so on the off-chance that you're close to Herne Bay, there's a darkroom at Beach Creative which offers tuition as well as private hire sessions.
I don't know how in-depth the courses are, nor how well appointed the facilities are, but I guess the 1-to-1 can be tailored.
I imagine there's similar little enterprises scattered around... not especially well advertised, but "findable".
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cs1

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Re: Courses
« Reply #5 on: December 15, 2017, 06:38:40 AM »
My "advice" from beginner to beginner would be to concentrate on 2-3 films that you like, ideally also on one developer and refine your technique from there. I used to jump from film to film and that didn't help with improving my developing technique. Find a low ISO film that you like (e.g. some ISO 100 film), and a high ISO film to cover different lighting conditions, maybe a film with an ISO in between.

I agree with Fran├žois that there're good resources on Youtube (and on the web for that matter). However, it took me some time to realise that many developing technique choices are mere opinions or matters of taste. I found that rather confusing at first but I simply picked the technique that I found most appealing and that yielded results that I liked (things like the way to agitate the film etc.). Now I have my own "style" and I use my research to improve it. And it's definitely worth asking the numerous friendly "pros" on this forum. They're really a patient and friendly bunch. :)

chris667

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Re: Courses
« Reply #6 on: December 15, 2017, 09:45:21 AM »
There is the Photo Parlour, Nottingham. They have various courses on black and white. I've never been on one, but then I have all my own stuff.

I'm not sure how much a course will help you though.

As CS1 said, you need to take a scientific approach, and keep making little changes in a repeatable way until you find results you like. The classic newbie question is "Which is better, film x or film y?", for which the only sensible answer is "it depends....". The results are subjective. My favourite film is Ilford XP2. I can get a "look"  from it that I can't find anywhere else. Someone else might hate XP2, and love Tri-X, for example. We're both right!

It's a long path, but ultimately the most rewarding one. And we can help you. :)

Francois

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Re: Courses
« Reply #7 on: December 15, 2017, 02:24:20 PM »
And if you want the nitty gritty on film developing, get The Negative by Ansel Adams.
But beware, this book can give you a serious headache and make your brain explode! Well, not really but it is probably ones of the most thorough books on the subject.
There's also Nocon in the dark by Gene Nocon which is more printing oriented and a simplified version of Ansel Adams' The Print.

Francois

Film is the vinyl record of photography.

02Pilot

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Re: Courses
« Reply #8 on: December 15, 2017, 03:16:02 PM »
And if you want the nitty gritty on film developing, get The Negative by Ansel Adams.
But beware, this book can give you a serious headache and make your brain explode! Well, not really but it is probably ones of the most thorough books on the subject.
There's also Nocon in the dark by Gene Nocon which is more printing oriented and a simplified version of Ansel Adams' The Print.

In addition, the chapter on development in Bruce Barnbaum's The Art of Photography is quite good, especially in conjunction with his discussion of the zone system (as an aside this is one of the best books on photography I've encountered - I highly recommend it, regardless of how advanced a practitioner one might be). For true head exploding power, you need to grab Anchell & Troop's The Film Developing Cookbook.
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Francois

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Re: Courses
« Reply #9 on: December 15, 2017, 09:09:48 PM »
This one's small change compared to Todd & Zakia's Photographic sensitometry :)
At least it's got recipes in it. Todd & Zakia's book has exactly 1.... a standardized developer for testing emulsions under a densitometer :)
Francois

Film is the vinyl record of photography.

p4portra

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Re: Courses
« Reply #10 on: December 18, 2017, 04:17:26 PM »
Hi All,

Thanks for your suggestions.

I am going to make contact with Beach Creative, but have also found a few local darkrooms that might be prepared to offer some tuition. I'll let you know how I get on.

A few interesting book suggestions to follow-up on here too.

Thanks,

Thomas