Author Topic: Digital camera question (I know)  (Read 467 times)

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chris667

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Digital camera question (I know)
« on: November 30, 2016, 04:45:32 AM »
My camera is great, but the meter is no good in low light.
I have a point and shoot type digital camera, which tells you the aperture and shutter speed, plus allows you to choose your ISO. Naturally, I am a film waster, but I could see it being handy as an alternative to buying a light meter?
Are those shutter speed and aperture readings spurious, or can I count on them for my real camera?

imagesfrugales

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Re: Digital camera question (I know)
« Reply #1 on: November 30, 2016, 05:03:33 AM »
The only way to find out without maybe senseless filmwasting is to compare with another proper indicating cam or meter. But probably it will work.

chris667

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Re: Digital camera question (I know)
« Reply #2 on: November 30, 2016, 05:09:23 AM »
You're right, of course.

I shall report back.

jharr

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Re: Digital camera question (I know)
« Reply #3 on: December 01, 2016, 04:10:26 PM »
My camera is great, but the meter is no good in low light.
I have a point and shoot type digital camera, which tells you the aperture and shutter speed, plus allows you to choose your ISO. Naturally, I am a film waster, but I could see it being handy as an alternative to buying a light meter?
Are those shutter speed and aperture readings spurious, or can I count on them for my real camera?

I occasionally use BeeCam Lightmeter for my Android phone. It works well enough for b/w film. I probably wouldn't trust it with slide film, but then I only cross-process E-6 film so that isn't a problem for me. Sunny 16 works surprisingly well unless you need spot metering for Zone or BTZS. But that depends on figuring out how many stops away from "sunny" you are. I have made what I thought were wild guesses and still got usable images (for the jharr definition of 'usable').
"The camera is an instrument that teaches people how to see without a camera"   -- Dorothea Lange
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Bryan

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Re: Digital camera question (I know)
« Reply #4 on: December 01, 2016, 04:31:18 PM »
I use a light meter app on my iPhone with all types of film with great results: https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/pocket-light-meter/id381698089?mt=8

For low light the Pinhole Assist app works great.  It corrects for reciprocity and works just fine with non-pinhole cameras.  https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/pinhole-assist/id466757473?mt=8

chris667

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Re: Digital camera question (I know)
« Reply #5 on: December 02, 2016, 10:48:39 AM »
I'm not modern enough for a smartphone! I had one for a bit, but found myself staring at it when I was out with friends. I think that's quite rude.
But thank you for the suggestions. :D

Late Developer

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Re: Digital camera question (I know)
« Reply #6 on: December 02, 2016, 04:19:35 PM »
I'm a committed Filmwaster and will always be so.  However, I own a very nice digital camera and see no wrong in using a digital camera - for photography as well as a stand-in light meter.  In fact, most Filmwasters own and use digital cameras.  The only way to assess the accuracy of the meter in your digital camera is to use it.  Bear in mind that metering patterns may differ from model to model so it'll be worth reading the tech for the digital camera to see if it's centre weighted, spot or average metered.  That said, there's usually lots of latitude with print film and a bit of over-exposure will usually be rewarded. Under-exposure is best avoided so, if in doubt extend the exposure time.
"An ounce of perception. A pound of obscure".

Francois

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Re: Digital camera question (I know)
« Reply #7 on: December 03, 2016, 07:00:05 AM »
Or if you want to go full analog and free, you can download the expomat cardboard light meter.
You'll be surprised at how good it is.
There's also another one who has more information... I can't remember the address right now but I'll post it here later.

Here are the links
http://expomat.tripod.com/
http://squit.co.uk/photo/downloads.html

I'll also post these in the ressources
« Last Edit: December 03, 2016, 08:13:36 AM by Francois »
Francois

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